The Girl Who Helped Thunder and Other Native American Folktales

By Bruchac, James & Bruchac, Joseph

Publishers Summary:
Welcome the second book in the Folktales of the World series! Engaging, inspirational, and above all entertaining, these legends come from Native American peoples across the U.S. Richly illustrated with original art, they capture a wide range of belief systems and wisdom from the Cherokee, Cheyenne, Hopi, Lenape, Maidu, Seminole, Seneca, and other tribes. The beautifully retold tales, all with informative introductions, range from creation myths to animal fables to stirring accounts of bravery and sacrifice. Find out how stories first came to be, and how the People came to the upper world. Meet Rabbit, the clever and irresistible Creek trickster. See how the buffalo saved the Lakota people, and why the Pawnee continue to do the Bear Dance to this very day.Stefano Vitale’s art showcases a stunning array of animal figures, masks, totems, and Navajo-style rug patterns, all done in nature’s palette of brilliant turquoises, earth browns, shimmering sun-yellow, vivid fire-orange, and the deep blues of a dark night.

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ISBN
978-1-40273-263-8
Publisher
Sterling


REVIEWS

School Library Journal

Reviewed on December 1, 2008

Gr 3-6 The Bruchacs retell Native North American folktales in a clear yet bold voice. The anthology is arranged geographically, a logical organization that reveals the diversity of Native peoples, from the corn planters of the East to the buffalo hunters of the plains to the gatherers of California. Descriptions of each region introduce the original inhabitants of those places, as the authors provide succinct yet enriching historical and cultural context for the stories that follow; unifyi...Log In or Sign Up to Read More

Horn Book Magazine

Reviewed on January 1, 2009

In a utilitarian sense, this collection of Native American stories would seem to have everything. The contents are divided into major culture zones, from the Southwest to the Far North; a prefatory note describes who lived in each, and their way of life; three or four representative stories follow, each with a brief introduction; source notes are appended. The book is illustrated throughout with fanciful adaptations of Native American styles and motifs, deftly done if hardly genuine. But both purists concerned w...Log In or Sign Up to Read More

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